“The Nose” by Gogol

“The Nose” is a short story by Nikolai Gogol, and is one of the first examples of surrealism in literature.  It was written in the 1830s, so it’s about a hundred years before surrealism became common.  For anyone who is interested in reading it, it can be found here full text in English. The storyRead more

“Winter Evening” by Pushkin

Aleksandr Pushkin was one of the greatest Russian poets of all time, and was responsible for modernizing the Russian language.  He also has kind of an interesting backstory, considering that his great-grandfather was from Africa and was given as a gift to the tsar, who took a liking to him and made him a general. Read more

“Medicine Road” by Charles de Lint

  Medicine Road is a desert fairy tale, and is my last book for the Once Upon a Time V challenge.  If you enjoyed my reviews for the challenge, be sure to check out the other great bloggers who contributed similarly themed posts. In this novel, Coyote Woman encounters a red dog pursuing a jackalope.Read more

“Demons” by Fyodor Dostoevsky

  This book was singlehandedly responsible for getting me into Russian literature.  I came across a battered paperback copy in my high school library (a terrible translation, mind you, with the title still as “The Possessed” instead of “Demons”) and was immediately sucked in.  Now I’m a huge Russian lit nerd.  Dostoevsky, I blame you!Read more

“Pale Fire” by Vladimir Nabokov

This novel is written in a rather unique style.  It opens with an epic poem by the fictitious author John Shade about his daughter’s suicide.  The rest of the novel is then a commentary on the poem by the poet’s friend, Charles Kinbote.  True to his style, Nabokov uses the narcissistic Kinbote as an unreliableRead more