“The Stationmaster” by Pushkin

19th century Russian literature has a certain timelessness that makes old stories relevant even today.  One example of this can be found in Pushkin’s “The Stationmaster.”  It is originally found in the collection entitled “The Tales of Belkin,” but let’s face it, writing about all five tales long enough to do any of them justiceRead more

“The Hollow Men” by T.S. Eliot

  The image to the left is by sive, and I thought it fit the poem incredibly well. “Those who have crossed With direct eyes, to death’s other Kingdom Remember us—if at all—not as lost Violent souls, but only As the hollow men The stuffed men.“ In describing T. S. Eliot’s “The Hollow Men,” it’sRead more

“A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeline L’Engle

  Yes, this is a throwback to my childhood.  “A Wrinkle in Time” was one of those books that was inspirational to me as a kid. The book is centered upon the Murray family, whose members are all awesome and nerdy.  There’s Meg, who is a misfit and doesn’t do well at school because sheRead more

“The Everything Seed: A Story of Beginnings” by Carol Martignacco

  Every religion has its own creation myth, and these myths are often taught to children in the form of stories.  A few years ago, I babysat some kids whose parents weren’t religious.  Their parents had given them this very cool book, however, that preserves the magic of a creation story. “The Everything Seed” isRead more

“Queen of Camelot” by Nancy McKenzie

  I’ve always been a bit of a sucker for Arthurian novels.  Nancy McKenzie’s “Queen of Camelot” was interesting, largely because it doesn’t portray Guinevere as a bitch, but rather more of a victim of circumstance.  At the same time, she is a rather strong character. McKenzie handled the whole Lancelot love triangle as GuinevereRead more

“The Idiot” by Dostoevsky

  “The Idiot” is one of Dostoevsky’s most intriguing novels, as it is Dostoevsky’s attempt to write a novel about a character who is purely good.  I studied this book in undergrad and so could go on about it for hours, but I shall try to be a bit more succinct. Prince Myshkin is theRead more

“Slaughterhouse Five” by Kurt Vonnegut

  I just finished reading “Slaughterhouse Five” for the first time.  I should have read it years ago; in fact, I attempted to read it my freshmen year of high school, but then was mildly traumatized after reading that a soldier in the novel carried around a picture of a girl attempting intercourse with aRead more