Life is Dark

Meghan Cox Gurdon has been at it again with a response to the criticism against her article “Darkness Too Visible,” which I commented on in an earlier post. Clearly, YA novels are out to get us and out to eat your children. Gurdon still just doesn’t seem to get it.  Adolescents have to deal withRead more

“Crystal Singer” by Anne McCaffrey

  Ah, yes… 1980s sci-fi.  I had heard good things about McCaffrey, although she’s mostly famous for her dragon books.  I was not disappointed in “Crystal Singer.” The protagonist, Killashandra Ree, reminds me a bit of Rachel from Glee.  She’s very ambitious and driven, and it took me half the book to figure out thatRead more

A Foray Into Science Fiction

Recently, I realized that as a whole I’ve neglected to read much science fiction.  This may, in fact, be the understatement of the year. Oh, I’ve read some classics, but I’ve never really counted them as sci-fi.  Zamyatin’s “We,” Orwell’s “1984,” and Huxley’s “Brave New World” all seemed to me to focus so much onRead more

“Moonheart” by Charles de Lint

  And, yet again, I return to Charles de Lint.  “Moonheart” is a bit different from his other novels, though, in that it is set in Ottawa rather than Newford.  There’s still a neat blend of Celtic and Native American mythology, but there is oh so much more. The story starts out when Sara Kendall,Read more

“The Nose” by Gogol

“The Nose” is a short story by Nikolai Gogol, and is one of the first examples of surrealism in literature.  It was written in the 1830s, so it’s about a hundred years before surrealism became common.  For anyone who is interested in reading it, it can be found here full text in English. The storyRead more

“Go the F**k to Sleep” by Adam Mansbach

  If you are a parent, you can identify with this book.  If not, you are probably lying.  This book is a father’s account of his attempts to get his child to go to sleep, told poetically as a children’s book for grown-ups.  It is, in essence, what every parent thinks but you’re not allowedRead more

“Winter Evening” by Pushkin

Aleksandr Pushkin was one of the greatest Russian poets of all time, and was responsible for modernizing the Russian language.  He also has kind of an interesting backstory, considering that his great-grandfather was from Africa and was given as a gift to the tsar, who took a liking to him and made him a general. Read more

“Interview With the Vampire” by Anne Rice

  Disclaimer:  Normally, I’m not into vampire novels.  Sometimes they’re okay (if you are Robin McKinley or Elizabeth Kostova).  Sparkly vampires bother me.  This book was really big when I was in high school, but I never got around to reading it because I was too busy reading Nietzsche and various social contract theories.  WhenRead more