“Naamah’s Blessing” by Jacqueline Carey

“Naamah’s Blessing” by Jacqueline CareyNaamah's Blessing (Naamah Trilogy, #3) by Jacqueline Carey
Series: Kushiel's Legacy #9
Published: June 29th 2011 by Grand Central Publishing
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 686
Format: Paperback
Source: Purchased
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Over the past month or so, I’ve been participating in a readalong of “Naamah’s Blessing” by Jacqueline Carey. See posts here and here for in-depth discussion of the book. Since readalongs contain lots of spoilers, I figured I might as well do a quick spoiler-free review my final thoughts.

Naamah’s Blessing is the third book of the third trilogy of the Kushiel’s legacy series. At the beginning of Naamah’s Blessing, Moirin returns to Terre D’Ange and befriends her former lover Jehanne’s daughter Desiree. Desiree is a lonely child who needs love and attention. But the young princess has been neglected by her grieving father. Moirin swears to protect Desiree’s interests, and that vow takes her far away to the Americas, where she journeys through the rainforest on a quest to find a long-lost prince. There, she must also reckon with another former lover, Raphael de Merloit, and the demon that still possesses him.

My thoughts on the book:

  • It was by far the best in the trilogy. It had the right balance of D’Angeline politics and adventure.
  • In the first two books in the trilogy, Moirin interacts with other cultures and realizes that people from them are not evil, challenging her preconceived notions and prejudices. In this book, the same thing happened, but with more complexity, as the group in question practiced human sacrifice. Carey offered a nuanced and sensitive take on the subject, and it was well done.
  • Balthasar Sharizai is my favorite character in the series, and I would love to time travel ship him with Phedre. They’d be good together.
  • I still think that this trilogy is the weakest in the Kushiel’s Legacy series. It’s a lot like the current Marvel movies. It’s entertaining, but unnecessary, and the earlier ones felt more innovative.

Comments make me happy! Please feel free to leave a reply.

2 comments

    1. Yeah. This was definitely my favorite book in the trilogy. And it really is a case where the first two trilogies gave me such high expectations that even though this trilogy was enjoyable, it paled in comparison.