“Homeland” by R. A. Salvatore

“Homeland” by R. A. SalvatoreHomeland by R.A. Salvatore
Series: The Legend of Drizzt #1
Published: 2005 by Wizards of the Coast
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 343
Format: Paperback
Source: Purchased
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This is the first book in a series about a Drow (dark elf) named Drizzt.  Drow society is ruled by evil dominatrices with snake-headed whips who worship a creepy-ass Spider Goddess.  Drizzt is set apart from the rest of his society because he happens to possess a functional conscience.  Throughout the novel, he struggles to find his place in the world and to avoid being murdered in the process.  He also makes friends with an enslaved demon-kitty named Gwenhyvar.

I play World of Warcraft, and there is nothing more infuriating than being killed by night elves named some variation of “Drizzt.”  I mostly read this book to determine whether Drizzt’s story was good, or whether it was merely a bad meme.  My conclusion falls somewhere between the two.

To the folks from Wizards of the Coast:  Fire your editors immediately, because they were not doing their jobs.  Hire me instead.  I know what punctuation is.  I am capable of using it.  I do not skip commas because I don’t know where to put them.  I know that quotation marks go at the end of a quotation, not in the middle of the next paragraph.  Publishing a book with this many errors is a serious insult to its readers.

This book made my head hurt from the sheer number of typos and punctuation mistakes.  I found the story itself enjoyable, and the setting intriguing.  I found myself wanting to see how Drizzt’s story progresses.  At the same time, this is one of those cases where a good story is marred by bad writing and editing.  A quick proofread would have made it into a far better book.

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13 comments

    1. Also I think that I was mostly disappointed because I expected something better. So many people have told me that this is good… I at least expected it to have been proofread.

  1. I recently blogged about the bad proofreading in teen novels, so I feel your pain. Apparently kindle versions of books also have terrible issues. Combine that with all the bad writing we suffer through online, and the kids who can only communicate with texting abbreviations, and I can’t help wondering if it’s worth caring..

    1. It’s one of my pet peeves when reading. I’ve actually put books down before due to bad writing/editing. In this book I caught about one typo per page, which was pretty bad.

  2. This is a series that wouldn’t normally interest me, but at the insistence of a fanboy friend, I read Homeland. Perhaps my expectations were low, but I actually ended up enjoying it (though I haven’t continued with the series)

    1. I just wish that it were written better. I did find myself getting wrapped up in the story, but then I got the urge to whip out a red pen and start fixing the errors. If there were a better editor, I might consider reading the rest of the series…

  3. With writers paid to make a novel out of a game you won’t get Tolkien. David Eddings’ Belgariad and Katherine Kurtz’s Deryni series are better reading.

  4. Oh, man, Wizards of the Coast. I remember reading Margaret Weis’s and Don Perrin’s The Doom Brigade and enjoying it greatly, so I bought the sequel, Kang’s Regiment, sight unseen.

    After reading about a gagged character shouting for help and an Aurak’s wings trembling (Auraks are the only type of draconians which don’t have wings), I sold that copy and will look for fantasy novels elsewhere.

    1. Oh wow… if I read about a gagged character shouting for help I wouldn’t know whether to laugh or cry at the sheer insanity of it. This is why editors are so important. 🙂